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Incident at Waterloo by Robert Hillingford.


Incident at Waterloo by Robert Hillingford.

Sir Henry Paget, Earl of Uxbridge, is wounded in the knee at the closing stages of the battle, in later years his nickname became One Leg.
Item Code : DHM0348Incident at Waterloo by Robert Hillingford. - This Edition
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PRINTOpen edition print.

Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm)noneHalf
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Other editions of this item : Incident at Waterloo by Robert Hillingford DHM0348
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PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!14.00VIEW EDITION...
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Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)noneHalf
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Now : 300.00VIEW EDITION...
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Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)noneHalf
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This Week's Half Price Art

 Study for the original painting Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth.
Halberdiers - Bosworth 1485 by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - 110.00
DHM835GL. 19th Regiment Artillery (The Highland Gunners) by David Rowlands.
19th Regiment Artillery (The Highland Gunners) by David Rowlands (GL)
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 The Medical Emergency Responce Team (MERT) picking up a casualty in Helmind Province, Afghanistan.  The armour plated RAF Chinook, protected by two Army Air Corps Apache helicopters, has a full complement of medical trauma personel onboard, as well as a protection force of RAF Regiment soldiers.

MERT Pick-Up by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 The Battle of Isandlwana on 22 January 1879 was the first major encounter in the Anglo-Zulu War between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom.  Eleven days after the British commenced their invasion of Zululand in South Africa, a Zulu force of some 10,000-12,000 warriors attacked a portion of the British main column consisting of about 1,800 British, colonial and native troops and perhaps 400 civilians.  The Zulus were equipped mainly with the traditional Assegai iron spears and cow-hide shields, but also had a number of muskets and old rifles though they were not formally trained in their use.  The British and colonial troops were armed with the state-of-the-art Martini-Henry breech-loading rifle and two 7 pounder artillery pieces as well as a rocket battery.  Despite a vast disadvantage in weapons technology, the numerically superior Zulus ultimately overwhelmed the poorly led and badly deployed British, killing over 1,300 troops, including all those out on the forward firing line.  The Zulu army suffered around 350 killed, and up to several hundred wounded.  The battle was a crushing victory for the Zulus and caused the abandonment of the first British invasion of Zululand.

The Battle of Isandlwana by Jason Askew. (GM)
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 Showing the burning of the Eagles and Standards with Napoleon and staff looking on before crossing the Ber and out of Russia with the remains of his once grand army.
Burning the Eagles on the Retreat From Moscow by Richard Caton Woodville (GS)
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June 6th 1944 allied troops land in Normandy, here assault troops of the South Lancashire Regiment of the British 3rd Infantry Division storm ashore at sword beach.

D-Day by Chris Collingwood (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
Described as the Deathknell of the Confederacy - Sharpsburg (Antietam to the North) was a savage bloodletting for both sides. It was said to be the bloodiest day of the American Civil War. In the painting, below the Dunkard church confederate General John Bell Hoods Texas Division - or what was left of it- stand in line of battle. In the distance Union Major General John Sedgwicks division can be seen advancing on the rebel lines. During the ghastly four hour struggle the Confederates managed to hold and then repel the bloodied remnants of Sedgwicks division back to the east woods and at about 10.30am, the carnage around the Dunkard church had ended. Eventually though, the Confederate forces were in retreat, loosing Sharpsburg to the Union but prepared to fight on for two and a half more years, bloodied but unbeaten.

Bloodied But Unbeaten (The Battle for the Dunkard Church During the Battle of Sharpsburg, September by Chris Collingwood. (P)
Half Price! - 8000.00
The decisive battle of the War of the Roses was fought near Market Bosworth. Richard of Gloucester, the last Plantagenate King of England was to try consequences with Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. The bloody conflict began in the traditional manner with the opposing armies drawn up in line. facing one another, except for the forces of Thomas Neville, Lord Stanley, as yeyt uncommitted to either side. King Richard, the Third of that name, is seated astride his grey charger in his fine blued harness. He is accompanied by his personal standard and the royal standard, alongside that of Lord Zouch to his right. His herald, trumpet are at his side. To his left Richards Chamberlain and Admiral, Viscount Lord Lovel, sits ready, astride his mount. To the rear we see the rest of the household and choice force of cavalry, kept out of shot to avoid unnecessary casualties amongst the expensive war horses.  After the opening deadly arrow storm, boys hurriedly collect fallen arrows for Richards men to shoot back. In the front line crossbowmen return fire from behind the safety of their decorated pavaises (painted with the suns and white roses of York and the white boar, Richards badge). Close by a gentleman at arms, mortally wounded by an iron ball fired from a hand gonne is dragged from the field by his page. Sir Walter Devereux (Lord Ferrers) accompanied by his standard is encouraging his household (soldiers wearing his livery colours ) to attack.  However, there is a marked reluctance on both sides to join the vicious close quarter combat of handstrokes and only in the centre is there any heavy fighting. Richard is informed by his herald that Henry and his household have been recognised and are now within charge distance. Faced with his armies reluctance to come to grips with the enemy, he decides to force battle himself by leading his own household, the Choice Force, in a desperate charge against Henry seeking to engage him in single combat.  Characteristically leading from the front Richard slays many a knight, including William Brandon (Henrys standard bearer) in his vain attempt to kill his rival. At this crucial moment Lord Stanley decides to join Henrys cause, attacks the choice force and drives it from the field. In the brutal hand to hand fighting the king is unhorsed and though surrounded, fights to the end.  -KingRichard alone was killed fighting manfully in the thickest press of his enemies - his courage was high and fierce and failed him not even at the death which when his men forsook him, he preferred to take by the sword, rather than by foul flight to prolong his life- (Polydore Virgil)

Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth, 22nd August 1485 by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - 4500.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

GIJH2740GL. A Good Day with the Hunt by John Frederick Herring (GL)

A Good Day with the Hunt by John Frederick Herring (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
Eddie Irvine raced Formula Ford from 1983 to 1988.  Driving a variety of different chassis, he won two Formula Ford championships by the end of 1987.  In 1988, Eddie drove in the British Formula Three championship and then joined the Jordan Formula 3000 team for 1990.  He won his first race at Hockenheim, finishing third overall in the championship that year.  The following three years saw Eddie driving in the Japanese F3000 series, almost winninh the title in 1993.  He also drove for Toyota at Le Mans holding the lap record for several years.  At the end of 1993 Eddie drove for the Jordan F1 team and gained notoriety by overtaking Ayrton Senna having only just been lapped by him.  In 1996, Eddie took on the unenviable role as number two to Michael Schumacher at Ferrari but in 1999 became the number one driver for Ferrari following a serious accident for Schumacher.

Tribute to Eddie Irvine by Stuart McIntyre.
Half Price! - 23.00
 The 2002 Grand Prix season started with much excitement as for the first few races the major teams sparred for supremacy. Just when it looked as if there would be a three-way fight between Ferrari, Williams and McLaren, along came Michael Schumacher in the 2002 Ferrari and showed the supremacy of the driver and machine package. However, against all odds and demonstrating supreme confidence and skill on a track where top speed was not all important, David Coulthard made one of the best drives of his career. Pulling out all the stops lie grabbed second spot on the grid. For once on race day he was not to be easily pushed aside and from the sprint to the first corner, he managed to grab first place and though pressed throughout the race, gave no quarter. In a supreme demonstration reminiscent of Senna and Mansell years ago, he made his car so wide that no-one could pass, and went on to take a memorable and well-deserved victory. Our picture shows him at Lowes Hairpin with the Williarris and Ferraris waiting to pounce at the slightest mistake - which did not happen.

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Half Price! - 30.00
GITW5609GS.  The Derby by Henry Alken (Snr)  (1774 - 1815)
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Half Price! - 200.00

This Week's Half Price Aviation Art

 Droning over the coast en route to another night attack on mainland Britain, the Zeppelins top gun platform goes into action as BE.2 fighters wheel around the gas-filled giants, trying desperately to fire their Brock, Pomeroy and Sparklet ammunition into the volatile gasbags that lay beneath the Zeppelins skin. Often freezing cold, always vulnerable, the defensive gunners occupied a tiny, sunken recess on the very top of the airship, shielded from the buffeting winds only by a shallow screen and their thick leather flying suits. Just a handrail and a shallow step lay between them and a vertiginous drop over the rolling sides of their massive craft. Their air-cooled Parabellum MG.14 machine guns did little to repulse their attackers, whilst the great Zeppelins offered themselves as huge, bloated targets for ground artillery as well as the brave pilots of the RFC.

Zeppelin Gunners by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Erich Lowenhardt was already the holder of the Knights Cross 1st and 2nd Class for acts of bravery even before becoming a pilot. After serving as an observer for a year, he was eventually posted to Jasta 10 in 1917 where he immediately began to score victories, sending down balloons and enemy aircraft at a fearsome rate. He was appointed Commander of Jasta 10 one week before his 21st birthday, making him one the youngest pilots to rise to such a rank in the German Army Air Service. He continued to increase his score steadily throughout 1917 and 1918, but was involved in a mid-air collision with a Jasta 11 aircraft on 10th August. Lowenhardt elected to abandon his aircraft, but his parachute failed to deploy and the young ace fell to his death. He flew a number of aircraft, but this yellow-fuselaged Fokker D.VII was his most distinctive and is believed to be the aircraft in which he was killed. His final victory total was 54.

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Half Price! - 50.00
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 Group Captain Billy Drake in Hurricane JX-P of No.1 Sqn scoring his first victory, an Me109 during the Battle of France, on 20th April 1940.

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